Comparative Effectiveness of Adductor Pull Back Exercise and Gluteus Maximus Activation Exercise on Pain and Functional Ability among Subjects with Anterior Rotated Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

D. Preethi

KMCH College of Physiotherapy, Tamil Nadu, India.

J. Prakash *

KMCH College of Physiotherapy, Tamil Nadu, India.

S. Sivakumar

KMCH College of Physiotherapy, Tamil Nadu, India.

M. Jagadish

KMCH College of Physiotherapy, Tamil Nadu, India.

N. A. Muralidharan

KMCH College of Physiotherapy, Tamil Nadu, India.

A. Jeyaseelan

KMCH College of Physiotherapy, Tamil Nadu, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SIJD) is one of the common pain generator resulting in chronic pain. Many of the day to day activities involve lifting and twisting of the trunk and pelvis leads commonly experienced anteriorly rotated SIJD. Life time prevalence of low back pain is 85%. In 10% to 25% of these patients, sacroiliac joint may be the cause of pain. The objective of the study was to compare the effectiveness of adductor pull back exercise and gluteus maximus activation exercise on pain and functional ability among subjects with anterior rotated SIJD. A quasi–experimental study with purposive sampling technique was conducted on subjects who were clinically diagnosed with anterior rotated SIJD and fit the study’s eligibility criteria, and were allocated into two groups. Group A received adductor pull back exercises for 8 weeks whereas group B received gluteus maximus activation exercises for the same duration. The outcome measures assessed were numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) for pain and modified Oswestry Disability Index (mODI) for functional ability. In between group analysis, mODI in group A and group B did not demonstrate statistical significance (p=0.9622) in NPRS group A and group B demonstrate statistical significance. The study identified that the both groups was effective in relieving pain and improving functional ability in anterior rotated SIJD.

Keywords: Anterior rotated sacroiliac joint dysfunction, adductor pull back exercise, gluteus maximus activation exercise, pain, functional ability


How to Cite

Preethi , D., J. Prakash, S. Sivakumar, M. Jagadish, N. A. Muralidharan, and A. Jeyaseelan. 2024. “Comparative Effectiveness of Adductor Pull Back Exercise and Gluteus Maximus Activation Exercise on Pain and Functional Ability Among Subjects With Anterior Rotated Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction”. Asian Journal of Orthopaedic Research 7 (1):1-8. https://journalajorr.com/index.php/AJORR/article/view/184.

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